Doctors Should Watch for Punctured Lungs in COVID Patients


By Robert Preidt
HealthDay Reporter

TUESDAY, Sept. 15, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Punctured lungs occur in as many as 1 in 100 hospitalized COVID-19 patients, a new study finds.

Before the pandemic, this problem was typically seen in very tall young men or older patients with severe lung disease. But some British researchers noticed that several patients with COVID-19 developed the condition and decided to investigate.

“We started to see patients affected by a punctured lung, even among those who were not put on a ventilator,” said Stefan Marciniak, a professor at the University of Cambridge Institute of Medical Research.

“To see if this was a real association, I put a call out to respiratory colleagues across the U.K. via Twitter,” Marciniak said in a university news release. “The response was dramatic — this was clearly something that others in the field were seeing.”

The researchers noted that damage to the lungs can lead to a puncture. As air leaks out, it builds up in the space between the lung and chest, causing lung collapse. This is also called a pneumothorax.

For the study, Marciniak analyzed data from 16 hospitals in Britain. He found that 0.91% of their COVID-19 patients had developed a punctured lung.

Of those patients with a punctured lung, 63% survived, but older patients had an increased risk of death. The survival rate among those younger than 70 was 71%, compared with 42% among those who were older, according to the study. The results are in the Sept. 9 European Respiratory Journal.

Patients with abnormally acidic blood, called acidosis, also had poorer outcomes. Acidosis can result from poor lung function.

“Doctors need to be alert to the possibility of a punctured lung in patients with COVID-19, even in people who would not be thought to be typical at-risk patients,” Marciniak said.

“Many of the cases we reported were found incidentally — that is, their doctor had not suspected a punctured lung and the diagnosis was made by chance,” he noted.

The researchers said there are a number of ways that COVID-19 could lead to a punctured lung, including the formation of cysts in the lungs.

WebMD News from HealthDay

Sources

SOURCE: University of Cambridge, news release, Sept. 9, 2020



Copyright © 2013-2020 HealthDay. All rights reserved.



Source link

Discover

Sponsor

Latest

Facebook cracking down on groups that give health advice

Mark Zuckerberg, Chairman of Facebook, speaks on the second day of the 56th Munich Security Conference. The fight against propaganda campaigns and other...

Trump claims talks are back on, after he shut them down

President Donald Trump gestures to the crowd of supporters during a campaign rally at the Allen County War Memorial Coliseum in Fort Wayne,...

BioNTech buys German site from Novartis to boost vaccine output

The headquarters of German immunotherapy company BioNTech stands on April 22, 2020 in Mainz, Germany.Thomas Lohnes | Getty ImagesGermany's BioNTech is purchasing a...

‘I really can’t explain it’

Tesla's rapid run higher, which has seen the shares gain nearly 400% this year, has left one notable investor confused."I really can't explain...

2020 Cadillac CT6 4.2TT AWD: We Test the CT6’s Blackwing

This should’ve been it. The American luxury/performance flagship sedan to finally stand up to V-8-powered German sedans like the Mercedes-AMG E 63 and...