Trump nominee to replace Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Supreme Court will get Senate vote, McConnell says


Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said on Friday that he will hold a vote on President Donald Trump’s nominee to fill the vacancy left by the passing of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court. 

In a statement issued just over an hour after the Supreme Court said that Ginsburg had passed, McConnell said the nominee, who has not been named, “will receive a vote on the floor.” 

Trump, battling against former Vice President Joe Biden ahead of November’s presidential election, is expected to move quickly to name a conservative replacement. The president didn’t comment much Friday night beyond telling reporters that Ginsburg “led an amazing life. She was an amazing woman.”

McConnell’s statement marks a contrast to his position last election cycle, in which he refused to hold hearings for former President Barack Obama’s nominee, but is consistent with statements he has made since Trump was elected. It came despite reports that Ginsburg told her family before she died that it was her “fervent wish” that she not be replaced until a new election is held. 

The timing of Ginsburg’s death ensured that mourning in Washington is likely to be combined with political calculations.

The justice, who sat on the bench for 27 years and was the second woman confirmed to the top court, passed after suffering from pancreatic cancer just under seven weeks before Election Day. 

Even before Ginsburg’s passing, Trump was seeking to win over conservatives with the promise of new justices who would be sympathetic on issues like gun rights and abortion. Earlier in September, Trump added 20 new names to his Supreme Court shortlist, including three GOP senators. 

McConnell’s willingness to hold a vote on a Trump nominee marks a contrast to 2016. 

During the last election cycle, McConnell earned the ire of the left by refusing to hold hearings for former President Barack Obama’s nominee, Merrick Garland.

Obama nominated Garland after the passing of Justice Antonin Scalia, who died in Feb. 2016. Hours later, McConnell put out a statement saying that Scalia’s spot should not be filled until after the election took place. 

The majority leader’s stance has brought charges of hypocrisy, but he has defended it on the grounds that the Senate and the White House are controlled by the same party in 2020, unlike 2016. 

McConnell repeated that defense in his Friday statement.

“Since the 1880s, no Senate has confirmed an opposite-party president’s Supreme Court nominee in a presidential election year,” he said. “Americans reelected our majority in 2016 and expanded it in 2018 because we pledged to work with President Trump and support his agenda, particularly his outstanding appointments to the federal judiciary,” McConnell wrote. “Once again, we will keep our promise,” he added.

The Supreme Court had a 5-4 majority of Republican appointed justices; a 6-3 majority could have a dramatic impact on the shape of the law on business and social issues for a generation to come. 

The nomination will not be solely up to McConnell. The Republicans hold a 53-seat majority in the Senate, meaning the party can only tolerate three defections from its ranks, assuming every Democrat votes against a potential new nominee.

While Trump’s first nominee, Justice Neil Gorsuch, easily gained enough GOP support, Justice Brett Kavanaugh faced a tougher time, following sexual misconduct allegations which he denied.

One GOP senator who voted against Kavanaugh’s nomination, Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, has previously said that she opposed filling a hypothetical Ginsburg vacancy. Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, who voted for both of Trump’s nominees, has also in the past expressed opposition to filling a 2020 vacancy. 

Neither Murkowski nor Grassley responded immediately to requests for comment on Friday evening. Other moderate GOP senators, including Sen. Mitt Romney of Utah and Susan Collins of Maine, also did not immediately return inquiries.

Collins voted to confirm Kavanaugh, but has said that she would not vote to confirm a justice in October, because of its proximity to the election. Romney was not in office when Kavanaugh was confirmed but later said he would have voted in his favor. 

One element that could shape the debate is Ginsburg’s own reported dying wish that she not be replaced before Inauguration Day. According to NPR, in the days before she died, Ginsburg uttered a statement to her granddaughter, Clara Spera.

“My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed,” Ginsburg said. 

Read McConnell’s full statement:

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell made the following statement on the passing of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg:

The Senate and the nation mourn the sudden passing of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg and the conclusion of her extraordinary American life.

Justice Ginsburg overcame one personal challenge and professional barrier after another. She climbed from a modest Brooklyn upbringing to a seat on our nation’s highest court and into the pages of American history. Justice Ginsburg was thoroughly dedicated to the legal profession and to her 27 years of service on the Supreme Court. Her intelligence and determination earned her respect and admiration throughout the legal world, and indeed throughout the entire nation, which now grieves alongside her family, friends, and colleagues.

***

In the last midterm election before Justice Scalia’s death in 2016, Americans elected a Republican Senate majority because we pledged to check and balance the last days of a lame-duck president’s second term. We kept our promise. Since the 1880s, no Senate has confirmed an opposite-party president’s Supreme Court nominee in a presidential election year.

By contrast, Americans reelected our majority in 2016 and expanded it in 2018 because we pledged to work with President Trump and support his agenda, particularly his outstanding appointments to the federal judiciary. Once again, we will keep our promise.

President Trump’s nominee will receive a vote on the floor of the United States Senate.



Source link

Discover

Sponsor

Latest

You can buy a Tesla with bitcoin, but it could mean a big tax bill

Artur Widak | NurPhoto | Getty ImagesYou may be aware that you can now purchase a Tesla using bitcoin.Tesla CEO Elon Musk announced...

A pullback for stocks could be coming soon

A trader at the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) at Wall Street in New York City.Johannes Eisele | AFP | Getty ImagesGoldman Sachs...

EasyJet q4 2020 earnings

Sean Gallup | Getty Images LONDON — Revenue at EasyJet fell more than 50% in the year to the end of September, the...

How coronavirus vaccines will make their way from adults to children

submitted by /u/shallah Source link